Interpreting disability in light of Scripture – part two

This is the second of two posts based on an article by the BBC entitled "The Disabled Christians reinterpreting the Bible”. The gist of the article is that disability is not a negative thing and may well be present in heaven. This immediately set my alarm bells ringing. I’ve come across this approach to theology … Continue reading Interpreting disability in light of Scripture – part two

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Interpreting disability in light of Scripture – part one

On Sunday 28th April 2019 the BBC published an article about ‘Disabled Christians reinterpreting the Bible”. The gist of the article is that disability is not a negative thing and may well be present in heaven. This immediately set my alarm bells ringing. I’ve come across this approach to theology of disability on twitter and … Continue reading Interpreting disability in light of Scripture – part one

Work is not a health outcome

A couple of days ago I saw this tweet on Twitter: "Work as a health outcome is a fundamental principle for us. There must be a shared approach within the health and social care system" Jenny Osbourne from @GM_HSC #ERSAMBW #disabilityconfident #nooneleftbehind pic.twitter.com/13KRhqnyEf — Pluss (@PlussInspires) May 23, 2018 This phrase creates a visceral reaction … Continue reading Work is not a health outcome

Yes, you are my keeper

The role of friends in disabled people's social isolation When Cain asked God if he, Cain, was his brother’s keeper, he meant it rhetorically. He certainly didn’t expect a response in the affirmative. But the answer was yes. It is yes. I’m trying to live independently of my parents. People from a range of  relationships … Continue reading Yes, you are my keeper

Governments have no right to be ignorant

The government still doesn’t know what its talking about. But this time it’s almost seven years on from when it gained power, and its politicians no longer have the right to plead ignorance. They do not have the right to remain ignorant on matters of great importance over which they hold the power. A spokesperson … Continue reading Governments have no right to be ignorant

The government’s rationale for PIP shows it doesn’t understand disability

On Thursday the government released its response to the consultation on Personal Independence Payments (PIP), the successor to Disability Living Allowance (DLA) that is to be brought in from April 2013.  Amongst the surprises were the government’s limitation of higher rate (‘enhanced’) mobility to people who cannot move more than 20m – a shock to … Continue reading The government’s rationale for PIP shows it doesn’t understand disability

Conservatives have ignored their history on disability benefit reform

A new disability benefit should reflect the policy intent that the important factor is not the medical condition but the effect that it has on people's care and mobility needs. The best that an examining medical practitioner can do is to take a snapshot of the person's condition on the day on which he sees … Continue reading Conservatives have ignored their history on disability benefit reform

Mobility scooters aren’t an adequate replacement for legs

A couple of weeks back I wrote about a recent experience using trains as a disabled person. As one reader pointed out, part of my problem was that I had chosen to buy a mobility scooter that was too big to be taken on public transport. Scooters come in a variety of shapes and sizes. … Continue reading Mobility scooters aren’t an adequate replacement for legs

The government doesn’t understand disability

On Monday the government started the roll-out of its new disability benefit, Personal Independence Payments. According to the government, PIP “better reflects today’s understanding of disability.” As a disabled person and researcher, my first response was to think that ‘DWP’ would have been a better fit than the word ‘today’ in that sentence. PIP is … Continue reading The government doesn’t understand disability

Who pays to employ sick people?

Many people are disabled because they are chronically sick.  These people cannot turn up to work regularly, because any given day they may be too ill.  They might be dosed up on painkillers to control their pain; they might be too weak to get out of bed; they might be too exhausted to concentrate; their … Continue reading Who pays to employ sick people?